From Fever to Fervor


Two little verses — that’s all I read.
And then this happened.

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Now, that’s what I call a Bible party.
I usually keep these celebrations private,
but maybe somebody needs to listen in today.
“Put wings to my words and send them to whoever needs them.”

Two little verses — Matthew 8:14-15. “When Jesus came into Peter’s house, he saw Peter’s mother-in-law lying in bed with a fever. He touched her hand and the fever left her, and she got up and began to wait on him.”

Mark’s gospel reports that this happened on the Sabbath. Jesus, Peter, Andrew, James and John were in Capernaum and had just been to church (synagogue). They must have been going to Peter’s house for lunch, after all, he had a wife who could make a mean falafel. Peter might have said, “Hey guys, come on over. My wife won’t mind a bit.” (Holy imagination is at work here. The Bible says nothing about Peter’s wife’s cooking.) Really? Peter was married?

“Don’t we have the right to take a believing wife along with us, as do the other apostles and the Lord’s brothers and Peter?” 1 Corinthians 9:5

So yes, Peter was married and his wife’s mother lived with them. Did they have any children, I wonder? Did any of the 12 apostles have children? Jesus’ brothers probably had children. Did they refer to the Messiah as “Uncle Jesus”? Ah….probably not. However, at one point, Jesus’ family thought He had lost his mind. Did they ever talk about their crazy uncle? (Time to reign in that imagination.) Back to the story.

Peter’s mother-in-law had a fever — but no one asked Jesus to heal her. Jesus just saw her lying in bed. (Greek word for fever = pyresso, to be on fire.) I’m sure Mrs. Peter was concerned about her mom. Then her husband showed up at lunchtime with four other men (2 were business partners, 1 was her brother-in-law, and one was a preacher.)

Oy vey.

Lunch wasn’t happening with m-i-l down in bed and Mrs. P tending to her. So Jesus went to the older woman’s bed and touched her hand. He didn’t say anything, he didn’t feel her forehead, he didn’t close his eyes and pray a long prayer. He touched her. And just like that, the fever broke. No, the fever fled, disappeared, ceased to be.

What did she do? She did what any good Jewish grandma would do — she got up and started fixing lunch. There were no residual effects of the fever, no decreased energy or lack of strength. She was good as new. (Greek word for “got up”= egeiro, resurrected) This was a mini-resurrection, a foreshadowing, a miracle for an unnamed, insignificant old woman. The dear soul got up and served, which was the only logical response to Jesus’ touch.

What a time they must have had around that dinner table! The ladies hadn’t been in church that morning, so they missed the amazing teaching Jesus gave and the dramatic driving out of an evil spirit. (Mark 1:21-28) Peter and company must have recounted that morning’s unusual worship service to the women. What a day to miss church.

They lingered long over lunch and deepened their relationship with this amazing Teacher. Mrs. Peter was so grateful for her husband’s new friend. Now she could see what drew her man to this Man. He was unlike anyone she ever knew. Could it really be Him? Messiah? Here in her humble home? Eating her falafels?

falafels

I live a fevered life sometimes.
I lie in bed, agitated by concerns and worries about the future.
I burn up with resentment and painful memories from the past.
Jesus sees me lying there, huddled under my burdens.
He touches my hand. I grab ahold. He helps me get up.
My fever is transformed into fervor to serve.

Every morning He resurrects us
so we can be about the Father’s business.

Jesus is aware of the needs
in your home,
in your heart,
in your body.
Ask Him in.
His touch changes everything.

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