The One Anothers


The phrase “one another” is found over 50 times in the New Testament. These words were written to churches, giving practical instructions to the community of believers on how to get along. Evidently, they needed help.

In the original language, the word for “one another” is “allelon” and it’s a plural, reciprocal pronoun. Which means Barney had the right idea:

“I love you, you love me, we’re a happy family….”

The first century church was an eclectic mix of slaves and masters, Greeks and Jews, men and women. Congregations consisted of people who would not have associated with each other under any other circumstances. You could say they were people from both sides of the aisle.

The focus of the “one anothers” was on relationships between fellow believers in Jesus. It was crucial for members of the early church to do some really good “one anothering” to maintain their witness.

Around 200 A.D., church leader Tertullian wrote, “It is mainly the deeds of a love so noble that lead many to put a brand upon us. ‘See how they love one another’, the pagans say.”

That kind of church could change the world.

“A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” John 13:34-35

I think we’re supposed to love one another.
Plural. Reciprocal.
Allelon.

In a world of division and mean-spiritedness,
the body of Christ has the privilege and responsibility
to display unity and warm-heartedness.

You’re my “one another”.
I’m your “one another”.
Let’s find out how to “one another” each other, shall we?

2 thoughts on “The One Anothers

  1. Great message today.
    Glad you are Back at it Dinah!
    I hear Pastor Dave Hutchitson (hope i didnt misspell it too bad) passed away. Great guy as I got to know him golfing the church league. Seems to me, for some reason, PB and you may have known him better.
    Sorry for your loss

  2. Pingback: Devoted | a small drop of ink

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